Early detection of insect infestation in stored grain based on head space analysis of volatile compounds

  • W. Laopongsit Food Science and Technology, School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, SYDNEY NSW 2052 Australia.
  • G. Srzednicki Food Science and Technology, School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, SYDNEY NSW 2052 Australia. Email: g.srzednicki@unsw.edu.au

Abstract

Insect infestation is a common problem for stored grain. Insects can cause quantitative losses as kernels are consumed by insects. Also, the appearance and organoleptic properties can be altered through physical damage and contamination by faeces, webbing and body parts of insects, respectively. Therefore, several detection techniques have been developed and applied to stored grains. Some methods demonstrate very high sensitivity but are relatively costly, and thus, are not affordable to the industry; whereas cheaper methods lack detection sensitivity. Consequently, volatile isolation techniques could be an alternative approach to monitor insects in stored grain. Odour detection is a useful tool for monitoring grain quality. It has become part of standard method for grading grain in the United States. Although identification of volatile compounds produced by fungi species has been extensively studied in most types of grains, this has been less done for insect infestation. This paper reviews the literature related to detection of insect infestation in stored wheat by using volatile isolation techniques.

Keywords: Grain infestation, Insect detection methods, Volatile isolation techniques, Solid phase microextraction
Veröffentlicht
2010-09-21