Potential for using pheromone trapping and molecular screening in phosphine resistance research

Vortrag

  • Gregory J. Daglish Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, GPO Box 267, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia
  • Rajeswaran Jagadeesan Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, GPO Box 267, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia
  • Virgine Singarayan School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia
  • Nisa S. Nath Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, GPO Box 267, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia
  • David I. Schlipalius School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia
  • Paul R. Ebert School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072, Australia
  • Manoj K. Nayak Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, GPO Box 267, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia
Schlagworte: pheromones, DNA markers, traps, phosphine resistance, allele frequency

Abstract

Phosphine resistance monitoring typically involves bioassays of beetles from population samples collected from grain storage facilities. Insects are classified into susceptible or resistant phenotypes based on mortality or survival at one or more discriminating doses. Although valuable, phenotype testing has several drawbacks. First, phenotype testing needs live insects, and considerable effort is required to collect and maintain them before testing. Second, population samples may contain multiple genotypes expressing different levels of resistance that may not be distinguishable using discriminating dose bioassays. Third, collections are likely to be focussed around grain storages to maximise sampling success. Recent research shows that several key pests are actively dispersing through flight. The availability of commercial pheromone lures and recent advances in molecular screening provide an opportunity to provide information on resistance gene frequencies more broadly across the landscape. This approach is proving to be a valuable adjunct to traditional resistance testing in Australia.

Veröffentlicht
2018-11-08