Growth, heavy metal uptake, and photosynthesis in 'Paulsen 1103' (Vitis berlandieri x rupestris) grapevine rootstocks inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from vineyard soils with high copper contents

  • M. Betancur-Agudelo Departamento de Engenharia Rural, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5681-7800
  • E. Meyer Departamento de Engenharia Rural, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6094-0641
  • P. E. Lovato Departamento de Engenharia Rural, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil
Keywords: copper; native mycorrizal fungi; soils; Vitis

Abstract

Soils in old vineyards in southern Brazil have high copper accumulation due to fungicide applications over the years, which can affect physiology and growth of young grapevine plants. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) alleviate toxic effects of metals and increase photosynthesis and plant growth. We evaluated whether inoculation with Rhizophagus clarus (Rh) from a mining area or with a trap-culture-enriched AMF community (Tc) isolated from a high-copper vineyard soil, improved growth and photosynthesis in grapevine rootstocks planted in young (< 10 years) and old (> 60 years) vineyards soils of Vale da Uva Goethe, SC, Brazil. Mycorrhizal colonization was higher in grapevines installed in young vineyard soil than those planted in old vineyard soil. Plants grew more in the old vineyard soil than in the soil from a young vineyard, and that was related to plant nutrient concentration in the soil. In both soils, Tc-inoculated grapevines had higher photosynthetic activity, while those inoculated with R. clarus had higher carbon assimilation. In conclusion, grapevines showed a positive response to AMF inoculation in different soil conditions, and the native AMF community from high copper soils are promising for inoculation of grapevines.

Published
2020-10-29
Section
Article