Changes in activity and isozyme patterns of peroxidase and chitinase in kiwifruit pollen

  • Yong-Su Song Institute of Environmentally-Friendly Agriculture (IEFA), Chonnam National University, Korea
  • Sang-Hyun Lee Korean Pear Research Organization, Chonnam National University
  • Jung-An Jo Asian Pear Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Korea
  • Seung-Hee Choi Institute of Environmentally-Friendly Agriculture (IEFA), Chonnam National University, Korea
  • Dong-Jun Seo Institute of Environmentally-Friendly Agriculture (IEFA), Chonnam National University, Korea
  • Yong-Kyu Lee Asian Pear Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Korea
  • Ung Yang Asian Pear Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Korea
  • Woo-Jin Jung Institute of Environmentally-Friendly Agriculture (IEFA), Chonnam National University, Korea

Abstract

In this study, changes in activity and isozyme patterns of peroxidase (POD) and chitinase in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) pollen were investigated under different storage conditions. Although residual activity was detected in heat-treated pollen, changes in POD activity were observed due to difference in storage conditions as revealed by preliminary studies in which pollen germination varied with different storage conditions. POD activity of kiwifruit pollen increased as proportions of viable pollen increased, indicating a positive correlation (R2=0.993) between pollen viability and POD activity. There was a detectable difference in the relative activity of POD enzyme between heat-treated and viable pollen. Decoloration of Congo Red was observed in germination medium which fresh pollen was cultured. The activity of individual chitinase isozymes present in kiwifruit pollen differed depending on storage conditions, which had a direct impact on pollen vigor. Although direct evidence showing that chitinase isozymes are implicated in pollen vigor is still uncertain, distinction of isozymes may facilitate more precise identification of viable pollen which possesses germination potential from non-viable pollen. Taken together, these results suggest that monitoring the activity of POD and chitinase can be an attractive alternative to evaluate pollen vigor in kiwifruit.

Published
2019-11-08